Turnover Intentions And The Moderating Effects Of Gender


Problem Statement


The hook is that at any given time, between 40-60% of employees are actively or passively seeking new employment opportunities. The anchor is that the replacement costs per employee can be as much as $8,000 per employee, when one includes the hours spent by human resource departments in the process. The general business problem is finding ways to decrease turnover has an effect on the quality of education and the bottom line. The specific business problem is keeping tenured and experienced staff is essential to operating a quality academic organization. Loss of key talent in any organization affects efficiency and productivity. This research study will examine one factor associated with this specific business problem. It will explore how gender affects intentions to leave among academic staff in the triangle area of educational institutions of North Carolina.

Purpose Statement


The purpose of this study is to investigate how gender affects intentions to leave among academic staff in the triangle area of educational institutions of North Carolina. This study will focus on the moderating effect of gender and the causal factors of intention to leave based on gender. To accomplish this, it will compare job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and role stressors and their connection to turnover rate based on gender. This study will use a quantitative correlational study to determine how these factors are related to the intention to leave the institution, based on gender. The research population will consist of 50 academic staff in the triangle area of educational institutions of North Carolina. The group will consist of 25 males and 25 females.

For this study, the independent variables are gender, organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and role stressors. The dependent variable will be turnover intention. The dependent variable will be measured by a questionnaire that examines the effects of the independent variables on the dependent variable. It has implications for social change that include the potential to lower turnover rates and attrition among the academic staff at the institution.

Nature of the Study


This study will explore a topic that is easily quantified using a survey questionnaire. The study will explore the effect of a single factor, gender, on factors that affect the intention to leave. The study will use descriptive and inferential statistics and random sampling techniques among the staff so that the results of the study can be applied to a broader population. This research will address the strength of the statistical correlation between higher or lower levels of factors that influence turnover intention including job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and role stressors.

The purpose of this study is not to explain the causal factors between these factors, only to see if a relationship exists between them. Therefore, an experimental or quasi-experimental design would not be appropriate for this research question. The dependent variable, intention to leave, will be examined as a function of one of more of four factors being examined in this study. When one variable is a function of another factor, then the quantitative methodology is the most appropriate method of examination.

Research Questions/Hypotheses


The study will examine four different research questions to explore the research topics related to the independent variables. The research questions will serve as guidance in the conduct of the research study. The research questions are as follows.

Can gender predict turnover intention among staff at an institution of higher learning?

In addition to the research study, the following hypothesis will be examined.

  • H1: Differences in job satisfaction between males and females will be predictive of turnover intention among staff at an academic institution.
  • H10: Differences in job satisfaction between males and females will not be predictive of turnover intention among staff at an academic institution.
  • H2: Differences in organizational commitment between males and female will be predictive of turnover intention among staff at an academic institution.
  • H20: Differences in organizational commitment between males and female will not be predictive of turnover intention among staff at an academic institution.
  • H3: Differences in role stressors between males and female will be predictive of turnover intention among staff at an academic institution.
  • H30: Differences in role stressors between males and female will not be predictive of turnover intention among staff at an academic institution.

An alternative hypothesis will be that other factors will be responsible for gender differences in turnover rates.

Theoretical Framework


The theoretical framework for this study will be based on previous research that examined the factors of role stressors, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment as a predictor of turnover intention. Role stressors result from ambiguity or confusion of job expectations. They may also results from role conflicts, or mismatched expectations about what the job entails. This can be due to a lack of information about what the employee is expected to do on the job. A disagreement about what one’s role is in the organization is another type of role stressors.

Yucel examined the relationship between job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and turnover intention. The study found that higher levels of job satisfaction led to higher levels of organizational commitment. This was found to have an effect on continuing commitment and lower turnover intention in employees. They study used the Brayfield-Rothe scale to measure job satisfaction. Organizational commitment was measured using the 12-item measure of organizational commitment by Allen & Meyer. Turnover intention was measured by three items that examined the employee’s intention to remain at their present job. The study used a sample of Turkish workers in the manufacturing industry.

The proposed study will use a similar methodology as Yucel only it will include items regarding role stressors. It will be conducted in an academic setting using a sample population that is divided by gender. This theoretical framework is supported by a study that examined differences in organizational commitment according to gender. This study used a gender matched sample population of 54 men and 54 women. The study examined a sample population from one small to medium enterprise in Iran. It also used the Allen and Meyer organizational commitment scale. The most relevant finding of the study to the proposed research study is that gender differences did have an effect on organizational commitment based on gender, and that these differences were more pronounced in certain industries than in others. The study found that the greatest differences were found in technology based industries gender. This research supports the need to carry out a similar study that explores gender differences in role stressors, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment in the academic school setting. It suggests that the setting is unique in terms of gender differences and how it affects the intention to remain with the organization.

Significance of Study


This research is significant because it will provide insight into factors that affect intention to turnover among men and women at an academic institution. There is significant evidence that gender affects organizational commitment. There is also evidence that role stressors and job satisfaction affect organizational commitment. Understanding how various factor effect these variables and turnover intention among males and females can help human resources managers develop strategies to achieve lower turnover rates.

This research will not only be applicable to the academic campus that is the subject of the study. Finding ways to reduce turnover rates will help the institutions provide a more consistent, quality education for their students. This research will help academic institutions develop employee retention programs that meet the different needs of both male and female employees, leading to higher rates of job satisfaction and commitment.

TeamHagkull.com. | Essay Writing Secrets